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R for Roasting

Published on 03 July 17

It’s the process that green coffee undergoes at high temperatures, during which the beans take on their distinctive brown colour.

 

In this phase the beans go through a metamorphosis: they change colour, decrease in weight, increase in volume, lose moisture and, above all, acquire aroma.

- At 100°C they turn a golden colour and the roasting fragrance starts to be released

- Over 150–180°C they become larger, shiny and brown

- At 200–230°C the roasting reaches its optimum level and the coffee gains its distinctive scent.

 

Once it’s been extracted from the roaster, the coffee is quickly brought to room temperature by using air flows and cold-water vapour.

The times vary, according to the types of coffee being treated and their final use:

  • - short cycles for the Robusta, emphasising its body and to soften its woodier notes
  • - medium cycles for the Arabica, to accentuate the fragrance and sweetness of the blends
  • - the espresso blends require long roasting cycles, which help to optimise the performance of the machines and to provide in a creamy and well-amalgamated espresso.

 

T come Torrefazione
T come Torrefazione

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